Leapdragon 2016 - Aron Hsiao Was Here

Anonymity  §

http://www.counterpunch.org/jackson06052006.html

I’m hearing about it again in the politics blogosphere, this whole “keep your anonymity in cyberspace” admonition, people working like mad to try to ensure that no-one knows who they are, what they think, or where they lie politically or emotionally.

It seems as though people are working very hard to not be people any longer. I can’t imagine working for, being friends with, or being complicit in anything or any firm that is unwilling to countenance the fact that I have personal feelings, political views, up days, down days, and a self beyond my productive cog-hood.

Maybe that’s naiveté. Or maybe its grounds for a moral superiority complex. I don’t know. Maybe it’s just evidence that capitalism has run completely amok.

People! Say what you think. Don’t take on clients in the first place if you don’t agree with them, otherwise you are a mercenary and little else. Don’t say what you don’t mean so that you have to be afraid of it later. Live as yourself, not as a caricature. At least then you won’t owe yourself any apologies on your death bed.

As for things like people equating time spent online during your personal blogging with real dollars based on the wages you earn while working, then taking this calculation and using it for legal purposes (i.e. campaign finance, taxes, or other)… That’s just evidence of how slimy things are these days in U.S. culture.

The suggestion that you can’t speak freely for or against whomever you wish—that your personal time is just an analog of your wages, and therefore, any opinions that you make known actually must be treated legally as though they were your earnings or legal tender by those who benefit from them or suffer beneath them, and that such opinions must therefore be subject to all of the rules and regulations that apply to, for example, donations or contributions to policy, party, or social advocacy… is crap.

That claim fundamentally does away with the tiny bit of personhood that Americans have left and more or less explicitly turns us all into property of the corporation, the government, the party, full-time. It’s in the same vein as the claim that whatever you invent at home you must surrender to the company at work since you’re in their employ.

Anyone who signs to these things on an employment contract is a fool and any company or organization that presses such claims deserves to be put out of business, if not legally now, later on when the revolution comes—and violently.